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Clientele (Clientèle)

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Original Language: French | 208 pp. | January 2018

2 Seas Represents: Dutch, Nordic, and North American Rights

LITERARY FICTION

Come and share in this latest work, which holds more charm and romance than one would expect of a local lawyer personage.[…]His mission? To decipher the modus operandi of each branch, the jargon of each trade, and to dive into Excel sheets full of English words. — Véronique Rossignol, Livres Hebdo

A beautiful portrayal of the wage-earning world, fictionalized but just barely. – Nathalie Peyrebonne, Le Canard enchaîné

Written with perfect precision. – Sylvie Sagnes, blog Cunéipage

Account of a lesser known trade, portrait of a society where the value of work is no longer go without saying, quick-paced tone of a young woman confronted by the loss of her ideals, Clientele is a novel like no other. It would be unfortunate to miss out on it this winter. – Ariane Bois, Le salon littéraire

A universal book that will speak to the current working lives of each reader. – Flavie Gauthier, Le Soir

We read tens of stories of “clients” who sound just like court decisions. And then there are the lives of women nearby, their joys, their weaknesses. They are well capable of that lucidity we love, of that humanity. – Yves Viollier, La Vie

She is a lawyer, and labour law is her field. Working for a modest law firm, she defends those who no longer understand what is happening to them. Panicked and incredulous, they are sacked or bullied, they resist, they fight and they jump through hoops to keep their heads above water. Like a figurehead, the lawyer listens to them and defends them, but at the end of her warlike days, she tries to lose herself in the streets of Paris, to distance herself and to ease the mental burden, seeking to forget for a moment the concerns of others and the harshness of the system. This dual-perspective book blends the life of the professional lawyer with the private life of the woman. Drawing on her own experiences, Cécile Reyboz speaks eloquently of the legal profession, the inhumane way in which people are often treated in the French workplace, and how professional and private lives are dragged down into a swamp of power and money relations in which the weak, who are dependent on the strong, find themselves trampled underfoot.